An invitation for an imaginary spatial journey

Love this! Love Modus Operandi’s work – all kinds of fantastic public art in unexpected corners of the country. Check this is out

Artist: Antoni Malinowski
Title of work: Spectral Flip
Client: University of Oxford
Location: Andrew Wiles Building, ROQ, University of Oxford
Year: 2015
Image credit: Valerie Bennett

maths_inst_oxford_antoni_malinowski_vb_2015_08_08_021

Antoni Malinowski commented on his installation:
Each day the journey of light is registered on the two large walls facing each other in the luminous foyer. To complement and enhance this journey, I began by sensitising this background by applying a reflective paint made with mica ground to a fine pigment. Then on the south facing wall, using light absorbing pigments, I painted in colours related to the warm end of the spectrum – from red to yellow. These light wave subtractive earth pigments have been used by painters for around forty thousand years.

The wall paintings will appear very different from different viewing points and with different light conditions. The colour will oscillate between darkness and light, appearing and disappearing, showing different sides of binary complementarities. One elongated thin line in each painting will contribute to the opening of the pictorial space – an invitation for an imaginary spatial journey.”

www.antonimalinowski.co.uk 

Awesome – literally!

Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford Commemorative Commission

I’m heading to Oxford this weekend, and I’m planning to visit the recently unveiled public art commission, Pollinator by Simon Periton, at the Radcliffe Observatory Quarter (I worked on a public engagement project for the work, so particularly excited to see the finished work realised and in situ)… here’s a few images of Periton’s work The Alchemical Tree at the ROQ…

Anyway, in checking out Modus Operandi’s website I’ve just stumbled across this exciting news about the Three Seated Figures by sculptor Daniel Silver. Silver’s Three Seated Figures is the winning submission of an invited competition for the Radcliffe Infirmary Commemorative Commission, organized by arts consultancy Modus Operandi.

Three Seated Figures by Daniel Silver 2015 maquette for Radcliffe Infirmary Commemorative Commission 1 (2)

Daniel Silver, Three Seated Figure (maquette) 2015, Carrara marble

For those that aren’t aware, the ROQ is a new, public development owned by the University of Oxford on the site of an old hospital, the Radcliffe Infirmary. Info on Modus Operandi’s website reads,

“The Radcliffe Nurses have formed an initiative to celebrate their work and that of all those in the former Radcliffe Infirmary on site, with a public artwork for the Radcliffe Observatory Quarter (ROQ). The Radcliffe Nurses raised funds for the initial competition and maquette; fundraising is now in progress towards the realization of this important work, planned to be located outside St. Luke’s Chapel, Triton Square.

Inspired by the Michael Rosen poem These Are The Hands, in particular the lines:

‘These are the hands
That touch us first… …And touch us last’

and referencing various existing works on site at the ROQ – Bernini’s Triton Fountain and John Bacon’s statue of Atlas and Hercules on the roof of the Radcliffe Observatory – Silver’s initial approach was inspired by the context and history of the site:
‘I wanted to engage with and understand the architecture and surroundings of the area. I looked at the layout of the Quarter and was struck by the straight, linear approach to the buildings, which effectively choreographs our movement through the space.’”

Interesting how Silver has been inspired by the psychology of the space in creating his sculpture, the maquette of which is currently on display at the Andrew Wiles Building in the Radcliffe Observatory Quarter. Beautifully sensitive that the artist has captured how the approach to medicine is often so linear, and yet the holistic approach taken by many nurses is quite opposite to that, and this has been captured in sculpture.

Fundraising is being led by the Radcliffe Nurses and Modus Operandi: those interested in supporting the commission should contact: modus@modusoperand-art.com I hope the work is realised.

Too beautiful…

Walter Keeler’s stoneware salt glaze teapot with overslung handle circa 1990’s on show (and available to buy for £850.00) at Oxford Ceramics Gallery – approximate dimensions are: 19.5cm x 21cm x 12cm. LOVE it! Love the speckled turquoise hues, love that athletic, yawning handle. Love the cheeky, jaunty angle of the short, little spout. LOVE this teapot!

Walter Keeler

Really like his sansai jug on stand too… Reminds me of a strutting peacock person with hand on hip and head held high. Just love these objects – such fun!

Walter Keeler  2

Here’s a link to some background information about Walter Keeler, and below’s a photo of his nice face (found online)…

Walter Keeler

That is all!

Oxford Vessels

 

Some people are born with a story to tell and a sense of the gift they posses that will help them to share that story; whilst others’ stories and gifts are more deeply buried. Through a project resulting in an exhibition in the Gallery at Arts at the the Old Fire Station, artist Georgie Manly has helped to access hidden stories…

Vessels is the new exhibition in the Gallery at the brilliant Arts at the Old Fire Station (sanwiched between George Street, the bus station and Gloucester Green) in Oxford that was conceived by artist Georgie Manly, and has been created in collaboration with Crisis (the national charity for single homeless people) and the Pitt Rivers Museum.

The University of Oxford Pitt Rivers Museum houses archeological and anthropological objects – collection upon collection of quotidian objects spanning time and cultures with several similar types of objects running through many of those collections. Enter, the vessel! The essential object that transcends time, class and culture. Used for eating from, drinking from, cooking with, containing, and occasionally as an objet d’art in itself – a vessel’s uses are limitless; which is why, when one doesn’t have a lot, one ensures one has a decent vessel.

Crisis clients have completed a 12-week course working with artist Georgie Manly to create a series of vessels made from earthenware clay that will be displayed at the OFS alongside Georgie’s own ceramic sculptural pieces that have been  inspired by the Pitt Rivers’ collection of early 20th century African animal traps .

All just a little bit of history repeating… Georgie has been passing down the art of simple hand-building clay sculpting techniques (see the images below) and teaching how to mix glazes, the likes of which the group has been admiring and studying on the various preparatory visits they have made to Pitt Rivers. 

     

Developing their own ideas around the theme of ‘vessels’, exploring material, process and concept, the group of Crisis clients have produced their own collection of individual and meaningful works in clay that relate to their own culture, needs, and experiences resulting in a highly original and personal installation of works.

Having recently taken up pottery myself, I can vouch for the absorbing meditative, primeval feeling of clay handling. It’s a process that really roots the artist in his work and on the earth – yet it’s so primeval that the process doesn’t feel like art, it feels like nature. Simply doing what you were put on this earth to do, what you need to do to survive. Whilst that’s clearly not true in this day and age, clay handling, much like digging earth with a spade, generates a curiously satisfying grounding sensation. I imagine that participating in a project such as this, studying similar vessels in the Pitt Rivers would also underline man’s basic needs and evoke feelings that we are not far removed from our ancestors, or brothers and sisters around the globe.

Like all exhibitions at the OFS, Vessels is free to view and opens on Friday 1 May and continues Saturday 20 June 2015. 

 

Meet Georgie Manly… On May 2, there will be the opportunity for the public to create their own works in clay, in response to the exhibition, with Georgie at Gloucester Green Market, from 10am to 4pm. This special event is aptly named Clay for All, and this entire project really does underline that clay really is for all.

On the Surface

I currently have some work on show in The Jam Factory in Oxford as part of sn exhibition called Oxford’s Sea View exhibition organised by Oxfordshire Artweeks. The exhibition is designed to offer a “taster” of the variety of work visitors might encounter at the Oxfordshire Artweeks open studios festival (the biggest and longest running open studio event in the country taking place this year between 2 and 25 May), and continues until 29 April… The work I’ve put in this show is called On the Surface – I hope you think it’s worth a look.


On the Surface draws on my interest in the personalised nature of decision-making, of pathways in art and life, and the way that one’s environment can dictate direction. I’ve developed an interest in sea over the past few years – intrigued by the moon, magnetic forces, the seabed, and tides. The idea of greater forces being at work dictating behaviour on the ‘surface’, and a path on the surface that most are totally oblivious to both fascinates and frightens me. 


Frequently drawing upon Lacanian theory I’m interested in the layered nature of understanding, this is represented in my work in Oxford’s Sea View exhibition through isolating the surface, allowing viewers to consider what lies above and beneath the sea’s surface and how that surface is influenced by wind direction, daylight, and other weather conditions in turn dictating pathways on the surface. In short, the work is a visual allegory for the necessity of, and the difficulty in, gaining a 360 degree understanding to fully comprehend a situation, and make informed decisions as a consequence.


In this exhibition I’m placing emphasis on the mystery, depth, force and beauty of the sea’s surface, whilst also inviting the viewer to acknowledge the enormity and influencing factors of what lies beneath and above. The images were taken of various seas mainly around the UK, most of which I photograph from a kayak or boat. The driftwood was beachcombed on the northern coast of Scotland. I really like the idea of this once landlocked organic matter adapting to its environment – once a tree, then perhaps make into a fence-post, only to find itself being taken by the tides, bobbing on the surface of the sea, later to be washed ashore, gathered up and repurposed acknowledging its brave lifecycle.


All works in this exhibition are for sale through The Jam Factory – 01865 244 613 Here are a few rubbishy snap shots of the work taken on my mobile…

   

On the Surface (i)

  On the Surface (ii)

  On the Surface (iii)

  On the Surface (iv) 

  On the Surface (v) 

 On the Surface (vi)

PRICES:

On the Surface (i) – £270

On the Surface (ii) – £260

On the Surface (iii) – £260

On the Surface (iv) – £275

On the Surface (v) – £160

On the Surface (vi) – £150